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ANTONIONI, BUÑUEL, KUBRICK, PECKINPAH, RENOIR, sirk, WILDER?
9

ANTONIONI, BUÑUEL, KUBRICK, PECKINPAH, RENOIR, sirk, WILDER?

9 Posts

Greetings...This is kind of a curveball I'm throwing at you, and you probably noticed that right away when you figured out that these seven directors aren't usually grouped together... Be that as it may, can you pick something you...

Greetings...This is kind of a curveball I'm throwing at you, and you probably noticed that right away when you figured out that these seven directors aren't usually grouped together... Be that as it may, can you pick something you want to post about one of these directors? You are welcome to post an article, a still, a scene/trailer, an interview if you can find one, a whole movie -- though I would add the caveat that Youtube bots (or the cryptic Youtube people) may remove whole movies from time to time. This is very postmodern (shout out to Lyotard!) of me, but there's actually no rhyme or reason as to why these directors are grouped together other than the fact that I really appreciate movies directed by these people. You may also post the work of a director whose work inspired these directors OR a director who copied/stole from these directors' styles but you should definitely establish the link between the two (whether influence or thief/appropriation) in your post. My theory in constructing this bead is that if you really love cinema as I do, chances are good you already appreciate and/or love the work of one of these directors. Not a competition, but it will be interesting to see which director gets the most posts...Thanks for stopping by. - Eri
Ericka
Oct 17, 2015
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Michelangelo Antonioni - Zabriskie Point, 1970 [Ending]
Ericka

Zabriskie Point

Michelangelo Antonioni's Zabriskie Point (1970) is my second favorite Antonioni movie behind the brilliant L'Avventura (1960), which really led me to appreciate the great Monica Vitti as an actress. A number of directors used the desert as a backdrop for their stories of transformation, repression and the counterculture during the first two years of the 1970s: Antonioni's characters wind up in Zabriskie Point near Death Valley; Alejandro Jodorowsky's characters travel the desert in his surrealist, allegorical Spaghetti Western El Topo (1970); and the desert becomes the scene of a death game of sorts in Peter Watkins' Punishment Park (1971). While watching Zabriskie Point, I kind of got the feeling that this was Antonioni's farewell note to the '60s. Helter Skelter rocked the nation the year before in 1969, and this movie basically delved into how difficult activism and organizing had become -- it was released a few months before the tragedy of Kent State. In Zabriskie Point, it seemed as if the characters were not only escaping the hegemonic structures of society, but they were also hoping to experience and construct a new reality away from the establishment. The inclusion of Pink Floyd's music is fitting in this regard. There is a surreal quality to the movie, but perhaps this was Antonioni's statement about appreciating the beauty of the '60s. This was a transitional film for what was definitely a transitional year.
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ANTONIONI, BUÑUEL, KUBRICK, PECKINPAH, RENOIR, sirk, WILDER?
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